Lady Justice on the Old Bailey in LondonPhoto: Unknown

Grievance mechanisms offer a means of access to remedy for people who have suffered business-related human rights violations, such as labour right violations, displacement, or destruction of sources of livelihood. Access to remedy is essential because it can mitigate the damage suffered and deter future violations.

SOMO supports workers, communities, individuals and civil society organisations in filing complaints using grievance mechanisms, with a particular focus on the National Contact Points for the Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD Guidelines) and the independent accountability mechanisms of international development finance institutions.

Based on our experiences in using these mechanisms, we evaluate their functioning. We advocate for improved accessibility for complainants and greater effectiveness in providing remedy. We also collaborate and coordinate with experts in other types of grievance mechanisms, both judicial and non-judicial, with the view of strengthening and transforming the overall system of remedy for victims of business-related human rights abuse.

We host OECD Watch, an international network aimed at improving the policies and activities of the OECD’s Investment Committee and the effectiveness of the National Contact Points for the OECD Guidelines.

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the bigger picture

Rights, Remedy and Accountability

Corporations have a responsibility to respect human rights wherever they are active. Yet business-related human rights and environmental abuses remain all too common. Across the globe, people face enormous challenges in securing respect for their rights and receiving remedy for corporate-related abuses.

Strong corporate accountability frameworks

SOMO seeks to address the global governance gaps that allow multinational corporations to operate with impunity. We push for strong corporate accountability frameworks that include effective grievance mechanisms. We monitor the implementation of international normative frameworks, including the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, to address the conduct of multinational enterprises in relation to human rights and the environment.

Support in filing complaints

We specialise on the use of non-judicial grievance mechanisms for addressing human rights, environmental, and social abuses. Victims of corporate misconduct are often confronted with weak governance, inadequate legal frameworks, and poor implementation of laws and regulations. In this context, non-judicial grievance mechanisms can offer a means of accessing remedy, particularly for people living in areas where the rule of law is weak or non-existent.

We support workers, communities, individuals, and civil society organisations in filing complaints using mechanisms of the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises and international financial institutions. Based on our experience with supporting complainants who seek access to remedy, SOMO advocates for improving the accessibility, effectiveness, and consistency of grievance mechanisms at the (international) policy level.

Corporations have a responsibility to respect human rights wherever they are active. Yet business-related human rights and environmental abuses remain all too common. Across the globe, people face enormous challenges in securing respect for their rights and receiving remedy for corporate-related abuses.

Strong corporate accountability frameworks

SOMO seeks to address the global governance gaps that allow multinational corporations to operate with impunity. We push for strong corporate accountability frameworks that include effective grievance mechanisms. We monitor the implementation of international normative frameworks, including the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, to address the conduct of multinational enterprises in relation to human rights and the environment.

 

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Updates on this topic

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